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Mapping the Loss of Opportunity in California: A Closer Look at Key Cities

Bakersfield | Fresno | Oakland | Los AngelesSacramento |
San Diego | San Francisco | San Jose

Learn more about the indicators we used to create these maps »

Closer Look: Bakersfield

Separated by the Golden State Highway 99, babies born into two different neighborhoods in Bakersfield have different starting points in life. East of Highway 99 in ZIP Code 93301, 9.6 percent of babies born have low birth weight, well above the state (6.8 percent) and national average (8.1 percent). West of Highway 99 in ZIP Code 93312, only 6 percent of babies born have low birth weight. Compared to their healthier counterparts, low birth weight babies are immediately at a severe disadvantage, carrying with them the burden of greater risks for early health complications and later chronic health conditions.  Find out even more below:

 

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Closer Look: Fresno

Often times, poverty becomes concentrated. In ZIP Code 93701, towards the center of Fresno, the child poverty rate is 71 percent, and the total poverty rate is 58 percent. But on the edge of Fresno in ZIP Code 93711, the child poverty rate is only 9 percent, and the total poverty rate is 7 percent. The overwhelming concentration of child poverty carries serious implications for the future of children growing up in those deprived communities: these children are significantly more likely to experience adult poverty, become a high school dropout, and have a teenage pregnancy outside of marriage.  Find out even more below:    

 

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Closer Look: Los Angeles

Beverly Hills (ZIP Code 90048) may be known for its glamour, but the same can’t be said about the childhood poverty that’s just a six-mile drive down Third Street in Westlake, L.A (ZIP Code 90057). Over half of children in Westlake grow up in poverty, and over a third of children are raised in single mother households. By contrast, only 4 percent of children in Beverly Hills experience childhood poverty. Find out even more below:

 

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Closer Look: Oakland

Just two BART stops away from San Francisco, in ZIP Code 94612 and 94618, residents can expect an overwhelming health disparity by location: asthma. ZIP Code 94612 has an average of 141 asthma hospitalizations a year, compared to just 25 asthma hospitalizations a year in ZIP Code 94618. Beyond its impact on the child’s overall health, the consequences of asthma extends into the classroom and disrupts a child’s ability to perform well in school. Find out even more below:   

 

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Closer Look: Sacramento

Although Sacramento is home to the Golden State’s capitol, it is certainly not a place of educational opportunities. Two neighborhoods less than five miles apart have wide gaps in educational attainment: in ZIP Code 95815, 32 percent of residents over 25 lack a high school diploma; next door in ZIP code 95819, a similar proportion of residents over 25 (38 percent) possess a four-year degree. The median lifetime earnings for workers with a bachelor’s degree is almost $2.3 million dollars, compared to just $973,000 for workers with less than high school diploma. For many of those adults living just five miles apart, that’s a difference of approximately $1.3 million dollars in lifetime earnings and marks a striking divergence in life opportunities for not just themselves but also their future generations.  Find out even more below:  

 

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Closer Look: San Diego

What appears on the surface as a physical divide between two communities can transform into a real divide in life trajectories for children. Over 16,000 children live in ZIP Code 92113, a community southeast of vibrant Downtown San Diego. But these children are nearly seven times more likely to experience childhood poverty (46 percent) than those living just across the Coronado Bridge (7 percent), less than six miles away in ZIP Code 92118. And almost half of residents in ZIP Code 92113 possess no high school diploma, compared to just 2 percent of residents in ZIP Code 92118. Find out even more below:   

 

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Closer Look: San Francisco

ZIP Code 94102, home to the Tenderloin District of San Francisco, has a long history of poverty and challenges associated with it, one of which includes a disintegration of the nuclear family. Thirty-nine percent of children in this neighborhood are raised in single-mother households. Being raised in a single-parent household comes with many disadvantages, including limited access to resources and greater risks of poverty and family instability. Just three miles away is the affluent Marina District (ZIP Code 94123), where only 2 percent of children live in poverty and 5 percent are raised by single mothers. Find out even more below:  

 

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Closer Look: San Jose

Silicon Valley is home to the thriving tech industry. Ironically, it is also a place with great disparities among neighborhoods adjacent to one another. In ZIP Code 95129 that’s less than five miles away from the Apple main campus, only five percent of children grow up in poverty. By contrast, literally next door in ZIP Code 95117, 22 percent of children experience child poverty. Find out even more below:

 

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Sources

Source for Low Birth Weight Infants: California Department of Public Health

Source for Asthma Hospitalizations: California Office of Statewide Planning and Development

Source for All Other Indicators: 2011 American Community Survey, 5-year Estimates, tables S1701 (Poverty Status), DP02 (Single Family Households), and S1501 (Educational Attainment for populations 25 years and older)

Note: All poverty data are based on populations determined by the Census Bureau to live at or below 100% of the Federal Poverty Threshold (FPL). A family of two adults and two children is considered to be in poverty when their gross annual household income is $23,283 or less. Child poverty rates are determined by the number of children living in households in which the total family income falls below the FPL. For more information see http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/poverty/data/threshld/.

 

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